• Understanding Your Gums

    You know about cavities, and tooth decay, and how important it is to brush and keep your teeth healthy. But how much do you know about the health of your gums? The gums are an important part of your mouth, and if they’re not in good shape, your whole mouth can suffer. What do you need to know about your gums?

    You might have noticed that your oral hygienist or dentist probes your gums during your regular check-ups. This is to determine if your gums are fitting snugly against your teeth. Unhealthy gums have pockets of space, and the deeper the pocket, the worse your gum health. It may feel like your gums are just being poked, but what the dentist is actually doing is measuring them. The tool used to probe gums is called a periodontal probe, and it’s essentially a tiny ruler. It is inserted into pockets in your gums, and the depth is recorded in millimeters.

    Your dentist will keep track of these numbers as a preventive measure against periodontal disease (gum disease). Only your dentist can diagnose gum disease, but in general, 1 to 3 mm means the gums are generally healthy, 4 mm means you need to pay more attention to your oral care, 5 to 6 mm indicates gum disease, and anything over 6 means advanced gym disease. By regularly checking gum pocket depth, your dental team can catch periodontal disease early, when it’s still relatively easy to treat.

    You can look for signs of gum disease at home, too. Swollen, sore, or bleeding gums could be a sign of gingivitis or periodontal disease. Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease, and it happens when plaque builds up at the gumline. Once it progresses to periodontitis, it can affect the bone and tissue supporting your teeth. However, these symptoms can also be caused by other conditions and even vitamin deficiencies. Hormonal changes like pregnancy, illnesses like diabetes, infections, and vitamin C deficiency can all be responsible for gum problems, so you will want to see your dentist to get the right diagnosis.

    What can you do to keep your gums healthy? First, pay attention to your oral care routine. Brush twice a day and floss once a day, brushing gently so that you don’t injure your gums. Consider using a water flosser, to clean below the gumline. Eat a nutritious diet, don’t use tobacco products, drink alcohol only in moderation, and take supplements, especially if you think you are not getting enough vitamin C. See your dentist for regular check-ups and cleanings, but in between visits, pay attention to your gums so that you can make a dental appointment if you notice signs of gum disease.

    At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322

  • The Relationship Between Oral Health and Acne

    Have you ever woken up to a new pimple on your face and wondered where it could have possibly come from? Most of us can attribute our breakouts to stress, not getting enough sleep, or poor diet, but sometimes the cause of our acne is closer than we think. Studies have shown that poor oral hygiene can lead to breakouts on the face, specifically around the mouth and chin area. This is because the Propionibacterium acnes bacteria, which is known to cause acne, can live in the mouth and be transferred to the skin through activities such as biting your nails, touching your face, or even kissing somebody on the cheek.

    To help prevent oral hygiene-related acne, be sure to brush and floss your teeth regularly, and if you bite your nails or have other habits that could transfer bacteria from your mouth to your face, try to break those habits. With a little care and effort, you can help keep your skin looking clear and healthy. Read on to learn more about the relationship between oral health and acne.

    Oral Bacteria and Acne

    Your mouth is home to millions of bacteria, many of which are beneficial. However, some types of bacteria can cause or contribute to acne. For example, Propionibacterium acnes is a type of bacteria that grows in the sebaceous glands of the skin. This bacteria feeds on sebum, the oily substance that these glands produce. When Propionibacterium acnes multiplies, it can block the pores and cause inflammation, leading to acne.

    In addition, Staphylococcus epidermidis is a type of bacteria that is commonly found on the skin. This bacteria usually doesn’t cause any problems. However, if it gets into a cut or scrape, it can cause an infection. Infections can lead to inflammation, which can make acne worse.

    Poor Oral Hygiene and Acne

    Poor oral hygiene can also lead to inflammation, which can trigger or worsen acne. When you don’t brush or floss your teeth regularly, plaque builds up on your teeth and gums. Plaque is a sticky film that contains bacteria. If plaque isn’t removed, it hardens into tartar, which is even more difficult to remove. Tartar can irritate your gums and cause them to become inflamed. This inflammation can spread to other parts of your body and cause or worsen acne.

    Tips to Prevent Oral Hygiene-Related Acne

    Good oral hygiene is important for many reasons—including preventing or treating acne. Acne sufferers who are diligent about brushing and flossing their teeth are less likely to experience breakouts on their face, neck, and chest. In addition, regular use of an antibacterial mouthwash can help to kill the bacteria that can cause acne.

    Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups. And if you are still struggling with acne, talk to your dermatologist about other treatment options that may be right for you.

    Contact Park 56 Dental Today!

    Talk to a dentist at Park 56 Dental about ways to improve your oral hygiene routine and see if that has an impact on your skin. Park 56 Dental in New York would be happy to help you get started on the right track!

     

     

  • Everything You Need to Know About Canker Sores

    Canker sores are small ulcers that form inside the mouth. They can be very painful and make it difficult to eat or drink. Most canker sores heal on their own within 1-2 weeks. However, there are some things you can do to help relieve the pain and speed up the healing process. In this blog post, we will discuss everything you need to know about canker sores.

    What Causes Canker Sores?

    The exact cause of canker sores is unknown. However, there are several things that may contribute to their formation, including:

    • Stress
    • Hormonal changes (e.g., during puberty or menopause)
    • Nutritional deficiencies (e.g., iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid)
    • Trauma to the mouth (e.g., from toothpaste that is too abrasive or braces that rub against the inside of the mouth)
    • Use of certain medications (e.g., blood thinners or drugs that contain sulfur)
    • Infections (e.g., viral infections such as herpes simplex virus type 1 or bacterial infections such as strep throat)

    How Are Canker Sores Treated?

    Most canker sores heal on their own within 1-2 weeks. However, there are some things you can do to help relieve the pain and speed up the healing process. These include:

    • Eating soft foods and avoiding spicy, acidic, or crunchy foods that might irritate the sore
    • Rinsing your mouth with a saltwater solution
    • Applying a topical numbing agent
    • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen
    • Applying a topical steroid cream
    • Undergoing laser treatment (this is usually done by a dentist or doctor)

    How Can Canker Sores Be Prevented?

    Canker sores are most common in teens and young adults, and can be caused by stress, hormonal changes, or a lack of certain nutrients. While canker sores are not contagious, they can be difficult to get rid of once they form. However, there are some things that can be done to prevent canker sores from forming in the first place:

    • Reducing stress through relaxation techniques such as yoga or meditation
    • Avoiding foods that you know trigger canker sores
    • Practicing good oral hygiene by brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing daily
    • Using a soft toothbrush and toothpaste without fluoride
    • Wearing mouthguards when playing sports

    If you experience frequent or severe canker sores, you should see a dentist or doctor to rule out any underlying medical conditions.

    Contact Park 56 Dental Today for Canker Sores Treatment and Advice

    If you’re dealing with canker sores, Park 56 Dental can help. We can provide you with tips on how to prevent canker sores from forming in the first place, and we can also provide you with treatment options if you do develop one. Don’t suffer in silence–contact Park 56 Dental today. We’ll be happy to help you get your mouth back to feeling healthy and comfortable again.

  • Different Bites That Could Be Affecting Your Oral Health

    How is your bite? Did you know that only about 30 to 40 percent of the population have what’s considered a perfect bite? The rest of us suffer from some kind of malocclusion, in which don’t meet the way they should and sometimes don’t meet at all. Everyone’s bite is uniquely their own, but there are some general types of bites that could be affecting your oral health.

    • If you have a crossbite, your upper teeth fit inside your lower teeth. Sometimes only a single tooth is affected, but crossbite can also affect a group of teeth, or all of your teeth. Sometimes, different parts of your upper teeth hit different parts of your lower teeth, coming down in front and behind them. This can cause the jaw to shift to one side and can wear down your enamel.
    • With an underbite, the lower jaw protrudes in front of the upper jaw. This can give a person a bulldog appearance, and it can put unnecessary stress on the joints in the jaw.
    • When a person has an overbite, the top teeth protrude in front of the lower teeth. While the upper teeth are supposed to be a little bit in front of the lower teeth, when they are too far in front it can create a bucktoothed look. In the case of a deep bite, the upper teeth can completely cover the bottom teeth. In extreme cases, the teeth can dig into the gums, raising the risk of gum disease.
    • An open bite, just as it sounds, means the upper and lower teeth do not meet when the jaw is closed. This can happen because of tongue thrusting or mouth breathing, and it can cause swallowing problems or speech problems if it’s not corrected.
    • If your teeth are crowded, this means they’re too close together. The problem may be that you have a small mouth, or perhaps large teeth, but whatever the case, it results in teeth that are twisted, overlapping, or trapped. Crowded teeth are difficult to clean, raising your risk of cavities and gum disease.
    • When teeth have too much room, dentists talk about spacing. If you have undersized teeth, oversized jaws, missing teeth, or a combination of these factors, you might have spacing issues.
    • Misalignment is a vague term that means your teeth are crooked. If your dentist says you have a misalignment, you may not have as severe a problem as people with some of these other types of bites, but your teeth simply don’t quite fit together. Fortunately, your dentist or orthodontist can help you get them back in line.

    When you’re ready to fix your bite, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

     

     

     

  • What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a condition that causes burning pain in the mouth. Approximately 3% of people suffer from burning mouth syndrome. The exact cause is unknown, but it is believed to be related to changes in nerve function.

    Treatment typically involves managing symptoms with oral hygiene, dietary changes, and medications. In some cases, behavioral therapy may also be recommended. If you are suffering from burning mouth syndrome, you are not alone. Read on to learn more about BMS and how you can manage your symptoms to feel better.

    An Overview of Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a condition that causes burning pain in the mouth. It can affect the tongue, gums, lips, inside of the cheeks, and roof of the mouth. The pain may be constant, or it may come and go. BMS is also known as glossodynia, stomatodynia, orodynia, and burning tongue syndrome.

    Are There Different Types?

    There are two types of burning mouth syndrome: primary and secondary. Primary BMS has no known cause. Secondary BMS is caused by an underlying medical condition or medications.

    Is Burning Mouth Syndrome More Common in Certain People?

    Burning mouth syndrome is more common in women than men. It is also more common in people over the age of 50.

    What Are the Symptoms of Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    The main symptom of burning mouth syndrome is burning pain in the mouth. Other symptoms include dry mouth, bitter or metallic taste in the mouth, and sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures.

    What Are the Causes?

    The cause of primary BMS is unknown, but it is thought to be related to nerve damage. Secondary BMS can be caused by an underlying medical condition, such as diabetes, Sjogren’s syndrome, nutritional deficiencies, or viral infections. It can also be caused by medications, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, or high blood pressure medications.

    Do Medications Cause Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    Medications are a common cause of secondary BMS. Antidepressants, antihistamines, and high blood pressure medications are the most common medications that cause BMS.

    How Do You Diagnose Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    Burning mouth syndrome is diagnosed based on the symptoms. A physical exam and medical history are also done to rule out other conditions with similar symptoms. Blood tests may also be done to check for underlying medical conditions.

    What Treatments Are Available for Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    There is no cure for burning mouth syndrome, but there are treatments that can help relieve the symptoms. Treatment options include mouthwashes, lozenges, and topical creams. In some cases, antidepressant or anticonvulsant medications may be prescribed.

    How Do I Prevent Burning Mouth Syndrome?

    There is no known way to prevent burning mouth syndrome. However, if you have an underlying medical condition that is thought to be a cause of BMS, treating the condition may help reduce the symptoms of BMS.

    How Long Does It Take for Burning Mouth Syndrome to Resolve?

    The duration of burning mouth syndrome varies from person to person. In some cases, BMS may go away on its own. In other cases, it may be a chronic condition that requires treatment.

    While there is no cure for BMS, there are treatments that can help lessen the symptoms. Park 56 Dental can work with you to develop a treatment plan that meets your needs. We may recommend changes to your diet, medications to help with pain or dryness, and behavioral therapies to help reduce stress or anxiety. Contact us today for a free consultation!

  • Can regular dental cleanings help with your lungs?

    You’ve no doubt heard that seeing your dentist regularly is important for your health. Not only do twice yearly dental cleanings reduce your risk of tooth decay, cavities, and gingivitis, but they also protect against problems like cardiovascular disease. But what do dental cleanings have to do with your lungs? According to a recent study, your trips to the dentist could have a major impact on your respiratory system.

    What’s the connection between dental cleanings and the lungs? When bacteria spreads to your lungs, this can result in lung infections. There are two ways bacteria can enter the lungs. The first is through inhalation. Saliva droplets are carried in and out of the mouth as we breathe, and bacteria in the saliva can enter your lungs. Most of the time, this isn’t a problem, because the immune system can protect you against becoming ill. However, if your oral health is poor and your immune system is overworked because of it, the lungs can become inflamed. The other route for bacteria to enter the lungs is through the bloodstream. If your mouth is unhealthy and gum disease is breaking down your gum tissues, the damaged tissue can allow bacteria to enter the bloodstream, causing inflammation throughout the body.

    The study was authored by Dr. Michelle Doll, assistant professor of internal medicine in the infectious disease division at Virginia Commonwealth University. In the course of the research, the records of over 26,000 people were reviewed. Researchers found that, of the subjects studied, those who never sought dental care were 86 percent more likely to contract bacterial pneumonia than people who had twice yearly dental checkups. Routine preventive dental care, including caring for teeth at home through brushing and flossing as well as having regular dental exams and cleanings, is an important part of protecting against this kind of infection.

    About one million Americans contract pneumonia each year, and about 50,000 of those people die from it. Pneumonia can affect anyone, but it’s more common- and more dangerous- in older people and people with lung conditions or autoimmune disease. While it’s impossible to keep all bacteria out of the lungs, it’s good to know that you can help protect yourself from pneumonia and other diseases by practicing good oral hygiene and seeing your dentist regularly.

    Whether you need a cleaning, specialty oral healthcare, or just good dental advice, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • Is your bite affecting your dental health?

    If your teeth are misaligned, you might not like your smile. On the other hand, you might find your slightly crooked smile charming! After all, it makes you look unique, and it’s not hurting anything, right? Actually, crooked teeth can have a negative impact on your dental health. Read on to learn more about how your bite affects your mouth and why crooked teeth are not just a cosmetic issue.

    Crooked teeth come in all sorts of variations, for many different reasons. Some people have mouths that are too small for their teeth, so the teeth become crowded and shift out of position. Other people have jaws that aren’t the same size or are misaligned, causing an overbite or underbite. The shape of your mouth and configuration of your teeth can be inherited traits or they can be the result of factors like improperly fitting dental restorations, misalignment of the jaw from an injury, or even thumb, sucking, tongue thrusting, or extended pacifier use as a young child.

    • Sometimes, misaligned teeth can interfere with eating and speaking. If you’ve got an overbite, for example, you might struggle to eat or experience discomfort while chewing. Trying to compensate for your misalignment can put stress on your jaw. You might also have trouble articulating your words, or you might speak with a lisp.
    • Crooked teeth can cause problems with your jaw. You might have pain or stiffness, or even temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Your jaw might hurt when you chew, or you might experience pain in your ears or face. Clicking or popping of the jaw is another sign of TMD, as is fatigue of the facial muscles. In severe cases, misaligned teeth can cause lockjaw, making it impossible to fully open or shut the mouth.
    • It can be hard to breathe if you have crooked teeth. This is because misaligned jaws cause the tongue to be improperly positioned. When it’s not resting in the right place, it can block your airways. This can prevent proper breathing and disrupt your sleep.
    • Misaligned teeth can become damaged. It can be challenging to clean teeth that are incorrectly aligned, so they’re at higher risk of cavities, gingivitis, and tooth decay. An overbite can cause cracked or broken teeth, and loss of enamel from grinding, and misalignment can strain the teeth, jaws, and muscles, which can also result in broken teeth.

    If your teeth are crooked or your bite is misaligned, your dentist can diagnose it by checking for abnormal alignment or abnormal appearance of your face. The dentist will also ask if you have difficulty chewing or biting, and will evaluate you for speech difficulties like a lisp. If the dentist believes your mouth needs correction, you’ll be referred to an orthodontist for diagnosis and treatment. In some cases, surgery may be recommended, but often, misalignment can be corrected with braces or Invisalign.

    Whether you need simple cleaning or a specialty service like Invisalign®, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • How Acid Reflux Can Ruin Your Teeth

    Heartburn is a common complaint, but if you’re experiencing heartburn or acid indigestion on a daily basis, you may be suffering from Acid Reflux, also known as GERD, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. GERD happens when the muscles of the esophagus relax and let stomach acids flow upward, sometimes into the mouth. As the condition progresses, the esophageal lining becomes corroded. It’s very uncomfortable, causing the burning sensation of heartburn. But have you ever considered that acid reflux could be damaging your teeth?

    Some of the symptoms of GERD include not only heartburn, but also difficulty swallowing, a burning sensation in the mouth, a sore throat and regurgitation. A person with GERD may experience nausea, vomiting, belching, and chronic coughing. Stomach acid that reaches the mouth can also cause erosion of tooth enamel, tooth sensitivity, chipping and discoloration of teeth, and bad breath.

    You probably already know that acid is bad for your tooth enamel. Oral acid, which is usually produced by bacteria, foods, and beverages, can dissolve the minerals in enamel, causing erosion and decay. Stomach acid is extremely strong, with a pH of 2.0 or less, so it can cause even worse damage to the enamel, leaving teeth yellowed, pitted, and sensitive.

    What can you do to keep GERD from ruining your teeth? Talk to your doctor about managing your symptoms. You might need medication, and your doctor may recommend some lifestyle changes. These include:

    • Avoiding trigger foods like chocolate, tomato-based foods, alcohol, coffee, and spicy or greasy foods.
    • Quitting smoking.
    • Not eating for several hours before bed.
    • Losing weight.
    • Not wearing tight clothing.

    You can also lessen the effects of acid in your mouth. This can be done by stimulating saliva production by drinking water, taking a saliva booster, or chewing gum. You can also help neutralize acid by rinsing with plain water or a cup of water mixed with ½ teaspoon of baking soda. Antacid tablets can also help balance the pH of your mouth.

    Your dentist can also help. Fluoride can strengthen your enamel, and your doctor can apply topical fluoride or prescribe a special rinse that has a higher fluoride concentration than you can get over the counter. Seeing your dentist twice a year allows the condition of your enamel to be evaluated, and your dentist can catch and treat problems while they’re still minor.

    If you’re looking for a dentist in New York, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Premature Birth

    It’s long been known that periodontal disease is a serious health problem. Beyond causing tooth loss and bleeding gums, periodontal disease can be detrimental to the whole body when bacteria from infected gums enters the bloodstream. Now, new research has revealed a link between periodontal disease and pre-term birth, showing that women with gum disease are substantially more likely to go into early labor than women with healthy gums.

    The study, conducted by University Hospital Hradec Králové, Czech Republic, and led by Dr Vladimíra Radochová, from the department of dentistry, was published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology. According to the Chief Executive of the Oral Health Foundation, Dr. Nigel Carter OBE, the research underscores the affect of oral health on a person’s overall health. The study showed that, of women who went into labor before 37 weeks of pregnancy, 45 percent had gum disease. By contrast, only 29 percent of women who experienced a perfect pregnancy had gum disease.

    Worldwide, premature labor is the result of about 10 percent of all pregnancies. In the UK, the rate is about seven percent, and about 10 percent of babies in the United States arrive early, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Premature birth can be the result of changes in the cervix or premature rupture of membranes, also known as “waters breaking.” So, what’s the link to periodontal disease?

    It’s thought that bacteria in plaque traveling through the bloodstream to the placenta causes inflammation. Part of the problem is that it can be difficult for women to maintain good oral health while pregnant. Hormonal changes can make the gums more likely to be sore, swollen, and even bleed, because they’re more vulnerable to plaque. The women involved in the study who went into early labor were found to have eight times more plaque than the women with more favorable outcomes, and dental health that was four times lower. In addition to gum disease, women who had premature labor were more likely to have untreated tooth decay or fillings.

    The takeaway from the study is that it’s important for a woman to care for her mouth to help ensure a healthy pregnancy. Brushing twice a day and flossing can help maintain oral health, and refraining from smoking and alcohol consumption can also reduce the chance of gum disease. Most important are regular dental appointments, to stay on top of oral health issues and keep periodontal disease at bay.

    During pregnancy and every other stage of life, when you’re looking for excellent dental care and advice you can trust, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • Why You Should Invest in Your Dental Health

    Hey! Yes, you!  You matter!  Let’s talk about an important way to show your body that you care!

    Yep!  We’re talking about your dental health and, in turn, your overall wellbeing!  Your mouth is there for you to help with communicating, both verbally and non-verbally, breathing, and eating.  Your confidence is conveyed through the communications that start from your mouth, including both your teeth and your smile! It is quite difficult to imagine living without a functioning mouth!

    Did you know that your oral hygiene and dental health practices impact your entire body?  In fact, many health problems, including oral health, are preventable just by intentionally caring for your teeth! So, let’s dive in and see why it is worth your time to invest in your dental health!

    1. Daily Habits are Healthy Habits

     Plaque build-up is a leading cause in gum disease which leads to heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses.  Flossing, brushing, and using antibacterial mouthwash are simple daily habits that can prevent not only cavities but also gum disease and other illnesses.

    Check out this fact: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 31.6% of adults between the ages of 20 and 44 currently have untreated cavities AND that 46% of adults over the age of 29 already have gum disease.  While this is shocking news, matters are made worse by the fact that this is preventable by employing simple daily oral health routines.

    1. Your Overall Health

     Proper hygiene habits and a nutritious diet benefit not just your teeth and gums but your entire body’s health and wellbeing.  Preventing gum disease can lead to reducing the risk of other complications, including heart disease, certain types of cancer, respiratory problems, kidney disease, joint inflammation, and even diabetic complications.

    Having healthy daily habits is important AND so is keeping routine dental visits a priority. Just like you go to doctors for other annual check-ups, it is extremely important to visit your dentist every 6 months for routine cleanings, x-rays, and check-ups.  Just remember, prevention is WAY easier than treating a problem that does arise! Besides, consistent proper care is FAR more comfortable (and affordable) than treating problems that do arise!

    1. Your Teeth Are Worth Your Investment

     Daily habits, such as flossing, brushing and using mouthwash, most definitely help with caring for your teeth and oral hygiene.  It is also very much worth your time and money if you see a dentist regularly, every 6 months, for a full cleaning and exam.  Look at this cost and prevention as an investment in critical resources rather than “just another expense” because the pain of dental problems and payment for their repairs can be mostly avoidable.

    At Park 56 Dental, we are dedicated to safely and comfortably helping you care for your smile.  Our talented staff are compassionate about our services.  Contact us today to make an appointment and invest into the quality and caring of and for your smile! So, what are you waiting for?  Contact us today to schedule an appointment at (646)679-3989!