• 8 Bad Habits That Ruin Your Dental Health

    Are you looking for ways to take better care of your smile? It’s easy to focus on things you should do, like brush morning and night, floss once a day, and visit your dentist for a professional cleaning every six months. But what about the things you shouldn’t do? Here are eight bad dental health habits that you need to break right now.

    1. Chewing on ice or hard candy: Munching on the ice cubes at the bottom of your drink may seem harmless, but this habit can damage your teeth if you bite down wrong. Chill your beverage before serving it to avoid needing ice, or drink from a straw to reduce the temptation to chew.
    2. Biting your nails or chewing on pens: These bad habits introduce harmful germs into your mouth, damage your teeth, and lead to jaw dysfunction. If you want to stop biting your nails, try wearing bitter-tasting nail polish.
    3. Using your teeth as tools: Never use your teeth to open packages, undo knots, tear tape, or open bottles. Instead, find the right tool for the job, such as scissors or a bottle opener.
    4. Constantly snacking or sipping on sugary drinks: Eating nonstop keeps your teeth in constant contact with food particles, increasing the risk of cavities. This habit is even more problematic if your snacks or drinks have high sugar content. The solution is to eat balanced meals so you aren’t tempted to snack all day. Then, reach for water instead of juice, soda, or sports drinks.
    5. Brushing too hard: Aggressive brushing can wear down tooth enamel and irritate your gums. To avoid these problems, choose a soft-bristled toothbrush and focus on gently massaging your teeth, not scrubbing them raw.
    6. Playing contact sports without a mouthguard: It only takes one hit to the mouth to chip, break, or even lose a tooth. You might also bite your cheek or tongue. To protect your teeth and soft tissues, ask your dentist about creating a custom mouthguard.
    7. Grinding your teeth: Stress can cause nighttime tooth grinding, or bruxism, a habit you have little control over. If you think you grind your teeth in your sleep, the best solution is to wear a special nighttime mouthguard your dentist makes just for you.
    8. Smoking or chewing tobacco: Using tobacco products of any kind stains your teeth, causes gum disease, and increases the risk of oral cancer. Save your dental health—talk to your dentist for tips to quit smoking

    At Park 56 Dental, we know it can be hard to break bad oral health habits. But just a few small changes can go a long way toward preserving your smile! For more tips or to schedule your next dentist visit, feel free to get in touch. We’ve been voted the best dentist in New York, with over 20 years of experience serving the 10022 zip code area. Call us at (212) 826-2322 or contact us online to speak with our NYC dentist today.

  • Why it’s Important to Replace a Lost Tooth

    Many people assume that a missing tooth only has cosmetic consequences. But while having a gap in your smile is enough to make anyone self-conscious, there are also numerous health-related reasons not to ignore a missing tooth. Whether you opt for a bridge, removable partial dentures, or a dental implant, here’s a look at why it’s important to replace a lost tooth.

    • Your teeth may shift and loosen: Every tooth helps maintain the stability of the one next to it. If you lose a permanent tooth, the surrounding teeth may begin shifting to fill the gap, undoing years of orthodontic work.
    • Chewing may be more difficult: The sensitive gum tissue where your tooth is missing can make it painful to chew in that part of your mouth. Then, if your teeth drift out of place, your bite may suffer, making chewing even more uncomfortable. Over time, you may find it cumbersome to eat solid, healthy food like fruits and vegetables, which can lead to poor nutrition.
    • You could develop TMJ disorder: To avoid discomfort, you may start chewing food on only one side of your mouth. However, this can strain your jaw muscles and lead to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, resulting in jaw pain, chronic headaches, and other symptoms. Lopsided chewing can also wear down your teeth unevenly and affect their appearance.
    • You may be more prone to cavities and gum disease. A shifting smile and altered bite can make your teeth harder to clean. This means you’re more vulnerable to tooth decay and gum disease, both of which may lead to further tooth loss.
    • Your jaw bone could deteriorate: A healthy jaw is only possible if you have healthy teeth to stimulate the production of new cells. If you lose one or more teeth, this stimulation disappears, which can lead to bone loss.
    • Your appearance could change: When your opposing teeth have nothing to make contact with, your muscles and bone structure may begin to change. This problem is most apparent if you lose several teeth, which can lead to sunken cheeks and an aged appearance.
    • Your self-esteem could suffer: Losing baby teeth may have been fun as a kid, but having a gap in your smile as an adult can drain your confidence level. First, you become concerned with your appearance and cover your mouth when you smile. Then, you may avoid talking too much if you develop a speech issue. Depression and anxiety can set in as a result.

    If you recently lost a tooth in a traumatic incident or had a decayed tooth extracted, visit Park 56 Dental to explore your tooth-restoration options. We recommend dental implants to many of our patients because they provide a hassle-free, long-lasting way to replace a lost tooth. Even if you didn’t qualify for an implant in the past, you may now be eligible. To find out what makes us the best dentist in New York, please call us at (212) 826-2322 and schedule a consultation.

  • Why Do Dentists Encourage You to Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed?

    The human mouth goes through numerous changes over the years. For many people, one of the most memorable milestones is the appearance of the third molars around ages 17 to 21. “Wisdom teeth” are so named because they are the final teeth to appear and come in at a mature age.

    When wisdom teeth erupt through the gums correctly, they can help with chewing. However, while there’s no definitive rule, most people have their wisdom teeth removed. Why is this? And how do you know if you should keep your wisdom teeth or not?

    Many situations warrant having your wisdom teeth removed. Here are the most common reasons your dentist may encourage you to make this choice.

    Fully Impacted Wisdom Teeth

    An impacted tooth fails to erupt through the gums, meaning it remains covered by gum tissue. This may occur if your mouth is too small for the tooth to emerge. Dentists usually recommend removing impacted wisdom teeth because trapped bacteria could cause painful cysts or abscesses to form.

    Partially Impacted Wisdom Teeth

    A partially impacted tooth erupts partway through the gums. Dentists almost always advise removing wisdom teeth in situations like this. After all, the partial eruption makes it easy for bacteria to get inside, leading to swelling, pain, and stiffness in the jaw. Tooth decay is also more likely because it’s difficult to clean a partially impacted tooth.

    Overcrowding

    Some willful wisdom teeth erupt fully, even if there isn’t room in the jaw. This can overcrowd your mouth and damage neighboring teeth. Your entire smile may even shift, throwing off your bite and causing jaw pain.

    Necessary for Your Dental Care Plan

    Your dentist may recommend wisdom teeth extraction as part of your overall oral care plan. For instance, if you’re planning to get braces soon, it’s wise (pun intended) to remove problematic wisdom teeth before you begin straightening your smile. And if your wisdom teeth come in after having braces, prompt removal prevents them from undoing all your hard work.

    Other Problems

    If you decide to keep your wisdom teeth for now, continue to monitor them for signs of trouble. It may become necessary to remove them if issues develop near your wisdom teeth, such as:

    • Tooth, jaw, or cheek pain
    • Repeated infections
    • Gum disease
    • Extensive tooth decay

    The decision to remove your wisdom teeth isn’t always straightforward. That’s why it’s important to visit the dentist regularly. Routine oral exams and X-rays reveal what’s happening in your mouth so you can take the best course of action for your oral health.

    If your wisdom teeth are giving you trouble, visit Park 56 Dental for a consultation. We offer compassionate, high-quality dentistry in the 10022 zip code area of NYC, and we’re confident we can help you make the right choice regarding your wisdom teeth. If you decide to have them extracted, rest assured that we offer sedation dentistry to make you feel more comfortable. Call us at (212) 826-2322 to set an appointment today.

  • Why Your Gums Hurt When Brushing Your Teeth

    Do your gums hurt when you brush and floss? Is there blood in your toothpaste when you spit into the sink? This usually means one of two things—either you’re being too rough when you brush and floss, or you’re developing gum disease. To rule out other more serious problems, be sure to visit your dentist. Otherwise, explore these solutions to help prevent your gums from hurting when you brush your teeth.

    When Your Gums Hurt Because of Rough Brushing and Flossing

    It’s easy to brush too hard when you’re trying to be thorough. However, you can easily irritate your sensitive gum tissue if you scrub aggressively. Here’s how to clean your teeth while protecting your gums:

    • Use a soft-bristled toothbrush.
    • Brush in gentle, circular motions.
    • Consider switching to an electric toothbrush.
    • When flossing, follow the curve of your teeth and avoid snapping the floss against your gums or using a sawing motion.

    When Your Gums Hurt Because of Gum Disease

    Mild gum disease, known as gingivitis, starts when a sticky film of bacteria called plaque builds up along the gum line. Ignoring gingivitis can lead to periodontal disease and, eventually, severe periodontitis. If your gums are swollen, red, irritated, and hurt when you brush, talk to your dentist about starting treatment.

    Other Reasons Why Your Gums Hurt

    There are many other potential causes of painful gums, including:

    • Canker sores
    • Tooth abscesses
    • Tobacco use, including cigarettes, vaporizers, and chewing tobacco
    • Hormonal changes during puberty, menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and menopause
    • Thrush, a type of yeast infection
    • Ill-fitting oral devices, including braces, retainers, dentures, and mouthguards
    • Chemotherapy drugs

    How to Sooth Sore Gums

    In addition to brushing and flossing more gently, treating gum disease, and tackling other causes of painful gums at the source, try these tips to soothe your sore gums:

    • Rinse your mouth with warm saltwater.
    • Rinse with mouthwash containing hydrogen peroxide.
    • Take over-the-counter pain relievers.
    • Apply numbing gel to the tender area.
    • Avoid spicy or acidic foods to avoid further irritation.
    • Eat yogurt with live cultures to balance the bacteria in your mouth.

    Discuss Your Symptoms with Your Dentist

    If your gums hurt or bleed for over a week, and your attempts to treat the problem at home aren’t working, it’s time to contact your dentist. A professional teeth cleaning can remove the stubborn plaque irritating your gums. Your oral hygienist may also perform a deep-clean called root planing and scaling if you have gum disease.

    Don’t ignore painful gums—stop by Park 56 Dental in NYC to discuss your symptoms with our dentist. We can examine your gums and teeth and recommend the proper treatment. Our office has been voted the best dentist in New York, with over 20 years of experience serving the 10022 zip code area, so you can trust us to take great care of your smile! Call us at (212) 826-2322 to set an appointment today.

  • How Teeth Crowding Can Impact your Dental Health

    If your teeth are overcrowded, it can make you feel less confident in your smile. What you may not realize, though, is that it also has serious implications for the health of your mouth. Here are some reasons why, along with some tips to help you improve your dental health.

    • It’s harder to clean overcrowded teeth. If your teeth are incorrectly spaced, you won’t be able to effectively brush and floss them. You’ll be unable to get the floss in between some of your teeth, and you won’t be able to brush every surface of your teeth. This can lead to bad breath, cavities, and health problems that occur when an overgrowth of bacteria in your mouth makes its way to other parts of the body.
    • Crowded teeth can increase your risk of gingivitis. When you don’t completely remove the plaque from your mouth, it can cause gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease. The symptoms of gingivitis are red, swollen, irritated, and sometimes bleeding gums, along with bad breath.
    • If your teeth are overcrowded, you may experience pain. Sometimes, when you have a crowded mouth, a tooth becomes impacted because it has no room to erupt from the gums. This impaction can also cause overcrowding, by pushing other teeth into a problematic position, which can lead to pain when you bite or chew.
    • Bite problems happen when crowding causes misalignment. If your teeth aren’t lining up correctly because they’re too crowded, you won’t bite properly. This can lead to cracking, chipping, and otherwise damaging your teeth.
    • Allergies may be connected to teeth crowding. This goes back to the oral care component: when you can’t properly clean your teeth, it leads to poor oral health. In turn, poor oral health has been linked to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and skin allergies.
    • You’re more likely to grind or clench overcrowded teeth. This grinding and clenching, also called bruxism, can cause headaches, face pain, damage to your teeth, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

    So, what can you do about crowded teeth? In some cases, especially with impacted teeth, you may need an extraction. Often, however, your crowded mouth can be greatly improved using orthodontia. One of the simplest and most effective ways to move teeth into the correct placement in your mouth is using Invisalign®. Talk to your dentist or orthodontist about the options that are available to you.

    Whether you need simple cleaning or a specialty service like Invisalign®, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • Does Coconut Oil Pulling Actually Work?

    Have you heard of oil pulling? Essentially, it’s the practice of swirling oil around your mouth and then spitting it out. Why do people do this, and is it actually a good idea?

    The practice of oil pulling originated as a folk remedy, part of traditional Ayurvedic medicine in ancient India. People practicing oil pulling use sunflower oil, sesame seed oil, or, most frequently, coconut oil. This oil is swirled around the mouth for somewhere between five and twenty minutes, long enough to be swished all over the teeth and mouth, and then it is spit out into the sink or trash can.

    Proponents of oil pulling claim that it removes toxins and bacteria from the body, pulling them out through the gums and mouth. Many different benefits are attributed to oil pulling, and advocates claim it can whiten teeth, treat tooth decay, eliminate bad breath, heal bleeding gums, prevent cavities, heal the sinuses, and even prevent heart disease. Some go even further, saying it can help with allergies and asthma, chronic fatigue, diabetes, migraine headaches, and acne.

    If these claims seem a little over the top to you, you have good instincts. From a scientific standpoint, there’s very little evidence to back up these claims. The ADA (American Dental Association) doesn’t recommend it because of a lack of science; there just haven’t been an adequate number of properly conducted studies to confirm its efficacy.

    On the other hand, there is research to show that oil pulling can have one particular benefit for your oral health. Some studies have indicated that oil pulling with coconut oil can significantly reduce the number of Streptococcus mutans bacteria in your mouth. This is good news, because S. mutans is one of the primary factors in plaque buildup and tooth decay. So, while oil pulling is unlikely to be the cure-all some claim it to be, by removing some bacteria from your mouth it can reduce your risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath.

    Does this mean you should try it? It’s up to you. There’s very little risk involved in oil pulling, as long as you use a reputable oil and then spit it out and don’t inhale it. Here’s the most important thing to remember, though: oil pulling is no substitute for good dental hygiene. Try it if you’re interested, but don’t stop brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing at least once.

    When you’re looking for excellent dental care and advice you can trust, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

     

  • What to Look for When Buying Toothpaste

    Buying toothpaste seems like it would be a simple process. When confronted by shelves and shelves of options, though, it can quickly become complicated. Add in some social media ads about alternative toothpastes and it’s understandable that you might be completely confused. Not to worry! We’ve got some tips to make buying your next tube of toothpaste simple.

    • Make sure the toothpaste you pick is ADA approved. Toothpastes with the ADA seal of approval are safe to use and guaranteed to be effective.
    • Check for fluoride. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay by strengthening your tooth enamel. When you use toothpaste with fluoride, you can maintain and, in some cases, improve your oral health. There are two types of fluoride found in toothpastes, stannous fluoride and sodium fluoride, with stannous being the more effective type.
    • Take a close look at the ingredients. Sodium laurel sulphate (SLS), for example is a controversial ingredient. While it’s useful for cleaning the teeth, removing bacteria, plaque, and food particles, there is also evidence that it can contribute to sensitivity and cause mouth ulcers for some people. If your teeth are sensitive, avoid SLS. If you do use it, don’t swallow it, because it can negatively impact your health. People with sensitive teeth might wish to look for potassium nitrate and strontium chloride, which can help desensitize teeth. Be wary of triclosan because this common bacteria-fighting ingredient may actually contribute to bacterial resistance.
    • Consider your specific needs in dental care. Are you looking for better tartar control? Tooth whitening? Desensitizing? Gum health? Think about what you’re hoping to achieve with your oral care and that will help inform your toothpaste decision.
    • Think about flavor and texture. While it may seem frivolous to choose a toothpaste based on the way it feels and tastes, it’s actually an important piece of the puzzle when you’re shopping for the right toothpaste for you. If you don’t like the way your toothpaste tastes, brushing your teeth will be less appealing.
    • What about alternatives to traditional toothpaste? There are some toothpastes that use unconventional ingredients and are somewhat trendy, but are they as effective as traditional toothpaste? Probably not. For instance, toothpastes that use aloe vera aren’t likely to fight plaque or gingivitis any more effectively than other toothpastes, and most aloe vera toothpastes lack fluoride. Charcoal is another trendy toothpaste ingredient, but it may do more harm than good, because it is abrasive and can damage your tooth enamel.
    • Ask your dentist for recommendations. When in doubt, ask a professional! Your dentist is an expert not only on tooth care but also on your unique oral health history.

    If you’re looking for a dentist in New York, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • Plaque vs Tartar vs Cavities…What’s the Difference?

    When you go to the dentist, a lot of unfamiliar terms may be thrown around. Sometimes, it can be confusing to keep up with all the instructions you’re being given and all the information your dentist is sharing with you. One source of confusion is the subject of plaque, tartar, and cavities. Do you know the difference?

    • Plaque happens when sugary or starchy food mixes with the bacteria in your mouth. A collection of bacteria then sticks together on your teeth, causing you to feel like your teeth are fuzzy. What’s actually going is that the bacteria have formed a biofilm on your teeth, creating a slimy, sticky, white or yellow film. Plaque can cause bad breath, and if you don’t remove it, irritate your gums. You can remove plaque, however, by brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash.
    • Tartar happens when you don’t sufficiently remove plaque. When that plaque stays on your teeth, it hardens, creating a sort of shield for bacteria. This hardened plaque is called tartar, or calculus. Tartar can’t be removed by regular dental hygiene, and must be removed by a dentist or hygienist. Tartar makes your teeth look discolored, and it traps plaque, making it more difficult to remove. In this way, plaque and tartar work together to remove minerals in your tooth enamel, causing tiny holes in the enamel.
    • Cavities are the result of bacteria and acid making it through those little holes. The bacteria and acid make their way to the dentin layer of your teeth, which communicates with your nerves and causes sensitivity. They then move on to the inner tooth, where the nerves and blood vessels are located, called the pulp. The pulp becomes swollen and irritated, causing pain and permanent tooth damage. This damage is known as tooth decay or cavities.

    As you can see, one thing leads to another when it comes to plaque, tartar, and cavities. That’s why it’s so important to brush and floss daily and see your dentist for regular cleanings. While you’re there, the dentist might recommend further treatments to combat plaque, tartar, and cavities. Dental sealants, for example, can help protect against plaque and tartar, and fluoride treatments can make your teeth more resistant to acid. Talk to your dentist about the best ways to care for your dental health and prevent tooth decay.

    Whether you need a cleaning or good dental advice, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (212) 826-2322.

  • How Dieting Can Cause Bad Breath

    Over the past ten years, there has been a lot of debate about low-carb diets such as the Keto and Atkins diets. Most of this discussion is about how they work, and whether they help people keep weight off for a long period. An overlooked aspect of these diets is their tendency to cause bad breath, also known as halitosis. Some people have taken to calling this phenomenon “keto breath.” How does this happen?

    One of your body’s main sources of energy is glucose. Glucose is formed when your digestive system breaks down carbohydrates from complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. When you eat fewer carbohydrates, your body has to find other fuel sources (primarily fat) for energy. This metabolic state is known as ketosis.

    When your body breaks down fatty acids, it creates a byproduct known as ketone bodies, or ketones. They come in three common forms: acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. These are regularly removed from your body when you exhale or urinate.

    If you consume a low-carb diet, your body relies more on fatty acids for energy because you aren’t consuming as many carbohydrates. As you use up more fatty acids, more ketones are released as a byproduct of the metabolic process at work.

    This surplus of ketones in your body can contribute to bad breath. But the ketones you exhale have very particular odors, which are mostly not like what you experience with normal diet bad breath.

    There’s another bad breath factor with low-carb diets. The sudden transition from carbs to proteins changes how the body metabolizes food. The breakdown of protein creates ammonia. A sudden increase in dietary protein will only exacerbate this effect, increasing the amount of ammonia in your urine as well as your stomach gasses. Since it takes a lot of water to remove ammonia from your system, insufficient hydration can degrade your breath as this excess ammonia builds up in your body.

    If low-carb diets have helped you, don’t despair. Some people on low-carb diets don’t develop bad breath. With others, it’s a temporary effect of the rapid diet change. And there are ways to mitigate the effect:

    • Drink lots of water
    • Use mints and/or gum to mask odors
    • Brush your teeth at least twice a day
    • Floss daily
    • Transition slowly into your new diet and see how these changes affect you

    If you’re experiencing halitosis, or if you just need the perfect place to get your teeth cleaned or fixed, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (646) 679-3989.

     

  • How to Prevent Plaque

    Everyone knows that if we don’t take care of our teeth we can get cavities. One cause of cavities is the buildup of plaque, which can also cause gum disease. Here’s an overview of what plaque is and how we can prevent it.

    Everyone has dental plaque to some extent. Plaque causes a slight fuzziness on your teeth that you can feel with your tongue. It’s a sticky film of bacteria that is constantly developing on the surface of your teeth. The bacteria in plaque produce acids after you eat or drink. These acids can destroy your tooth enamel, leading to cavities and also gingivitis aka gum disease.

    Plaque can also form under your gums and on your tooth roots. They can break down the jaw bones that support your teeth. If left untreated, plaque can harden into tartar, which is harder to remove. Proper dental hygiene habits, most importantly daily brushing and flossing, gets rid of a lot of this plaque. If you don’t like using normal dental floss there are options for you, including dental picks, pre-threaded flossers, brushes that fit between your teeth, water flossers or wooden plaque removers. Mouthwash is useful for loosening plaque so you can brush it off better, or spit or rinse it out of your mouth. But be careful to not get a kind that will dry your mouth out, because that actually makes your mouth more vulnerable to plaque formation.

    Although we all get plaque, you may be more susceptible to plaque formation if you:

    • Smoke
    • Have dry mouth due to medical conditions or medications
    • Have a history of head or neck radiation

    Your diet is also an important factor for plaque formation. Plaque can form quickly when the bacteria in your mouth mixes with sugary or starchy foods such as soft drinks, milk, juice, fruit, pasta or bread. These bacteria release acids that break down carbohydrates in food and drinks, so they do serve a useful function in that regard. Plaque is clearly a downside. Many dentists will tell you that you can eat or drink pretty much whatever you like, as long as it’s in moderation. Whenever possible, drink water or brush your teeth right after consuming these problematic foods or drinks, to get that dangerous stuff off your teeth before they can help form plaque.

    Regular dental cleanings are important too, because there are spaces that are hard for you to clean on your own. Dentists and dental hygienists have special tools to find and remove plaque.

    If you’re looking for the perfect place to get your teeth cleaned or fixed, choose the practice that was voted best dentist in NYC! At Park 56 Dental Group, we offer pediatric, prosthodontics, endodontics, oral surgery, Invisalign®, emergency, and sedation dentistry, all at the highest level of treatment. We serve the Midtown, Central Park, Upper East Side, Park Avenue, and all surrounding Manhattan and New York areas, with a patient-centered practice that has hours to fit your schedule. Schedule your complimentary consultation today by contacting us online or calling us at (646) 679-3989.