• How to Reduce Teeth Whitening Pain

    Whitening your teeth is a fast, easy way to improve the appearance of your smile. One common side effect is temporary pain and sensitivity to hot and cold drinks. We’re here to help you understand what causes teeth whitening pain and how you can prevent it.

    Is Tooth Whitening Safe?

    Zoom! whitening is a professional treatment that brightens your smile by an average of eight shades in a single, one-hour visit. While it’s championed as a simple, safe, and pain-free process, some patients still experience temporary hypersensitivity following treatment. If you’re concerned about this, speak with your dentist before having Zoom! whitening performed.

    Why Do Teeth Sometimes Hurt After Whitening?

    You are most likely to experience discomfort after whitening if you already have sensitive teeth. This is often caused by thin enamel or exposed roots. Both issues leave the underlying layer, known as dentin, vulnerable to the bleaching agent found in teeth whitening products. If the nerve endings here are irritated by the whitening process, you could be left with hypersensitivity for the next 24 to 48 hours.

    How to Prevent Teeth Whitening Pain Before Treatment

    • Switch to desensitizing toothpaste: One to two weeks prior to your treatment, brush with toothpaste containing 5 percent potassium nitrate to build up a resistance to sensitivity. This substance is known to reduce tooth pain, so it’s a common ingredient in desensitizing toothpaste. Brush before your treatment to clean and prepare the surface of your teeth for whitening.
    • Take medicine: Immediately before your whitening appointment, take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs as a proactive measure against tooth sensitivity.
    • Apply ACP gel: Request relief ACP desensitizing gel from your dentist. If you have whitening trays at home, dispense a pea-sized amount into each impression and wear the tray for 30 minutes before heading to your professional Zoom! whitening treatment. If you don’t have whitening trays, apply the gel using a toothbrush.

    How to Prevent Teeth Whitening Pain After Treatment

    • Wait to brush: If you brush your teeth too soon after whitening, you will further expose the dentin, increasing sensitivity. Therefore, you should wait to brush for a couple of hours. When you do, brush extra gently. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush and lukewarm water to take some of the sting out of your sensitive teeth.
    • Avoid hot and cold drinks: Hot coffee and ice-cold water could cause pain, so stick with room-temperature beverages for the next 24 to 48 hours. You may also find it helpful to drink through a straw so liquids bypass your teeth for the most part.
    • Keep taking medicine and using ACP gel: If you continue to experience sensitivity despite your other efforts, take more anti-inflammatory drugs and reapply the ACP gel after each meal.

    Park 56 Dental is proud to offer Zoom! whitening, the fast, easy way to whiten your smile. If you’re interested in scheduling treatment, or you have more questions about tooth sensitivity, please contact us online or by phone at (212) 826-2322.

  • 15 Things That Cause Bad Breath

    Do you suffer from bad breath, also known as halitosis? In a majority of cases, the odor stems from bacteria in your mouth. Everyone knows that eating onions and garlic can make your breath stink, but these are far from the only culprits. Learn what other things cause bad breath so you can avoid them.

    1. Citrus fruit: Odor-causing bacteria love acidic environments, so eating lots of citrus fruit invites bad breath to stick around.
    2. Pasta sauce: Tomatoes are acidic as well, meaning red pasta sauce can contribute to bad breath.
    3. High-protein diets: The body produces ammonia as a byproduct of breaking down protein. When the odor escapes from your mouth, it causes bad breath.
    4. High-sugar diets: Because of how sugar interacts with the bacteria in your mouth, eating too many sweets could result in sour breath.
    5. Peanut butter: Its sticky consistency makes peanut butter difficult for saliva to wash away. As it lingers, bacteria feed, making your breath stink for hours at a time.
    6. Canned fish: Fishy compounds tend to linger in the mouth, giving off an unsavory smell until you drink water, chew gum, or brush your teeth.
    7. Cheese: Most dairy products, including cheese, contain amino acids that react with bacteria in your mouth to produce excess hydrogen sulfide. The result is a mouth that smells like rotten eggs.
    8. Horseradish: Isothiocyanate is a sulfur-containing compound found in all cruciferous vegetables, including horseradish. Mint is the best way to combat the effects of this compound.
    9. Coffee: Your favorite morning beverage has a drying effect on the mouth, reducing saliva flow and allowing odor-causing bacteria to thrive.
    10. Alcohol: Excessive alcohol consumption causes dehydration, which can reduce saliva production. This creates a dry environment for foul-smelling bacteria to flourish.
    11. Tobacco: Smoking or chewing tobacco causes an unpleasant odor in the mouth. Smokers are also more likely to develop gum disease, another source of bad breath.
    12. Medications: Some prescriptions cause dry mouth, a known cause of halitosis. Other drugs break down in your body, releasing foul-smelling chemicals that can be carried on your breath.
    13. Infections: Gum disease, tooth decay, mouth sores, or surgical wounds may lead to infections that cause bad breath and an unpleasant taste in your mouth.
    14. Digestive issues: Chronic digestive distress, acid reflux, and bowel disorders can produce gases that cause halitosis. An inability to digest certain enzymes could also lead to bad breath.
    15. Poor dental hygiene: The best way to combat almost all sources of bad breath is to brush, floss, and rinse with mouthwash. By maintaining good oral health, you can combat halitosis before it starts.

    If your bad breath just won’t go away, you may need help from a dentist to uncover the underlying cause. Please contact Park 56 Dental at (212) 826-2322 to work with one of the top dentists in New York. By providing a thorough dental cleaning, we can help you get rid of bad breath for good!

  • Everything You Need to Know About Sedation Dentistry

    Many people avoid going to the dentist because they’re nervous about having work done. Some dental anxiety stems from a fear of pain or finding out something is wrong. Other people worry about racking up expenses or being rushed to make decisions. You might be prone to dental anxiety if you have had a negative experience like this in the past.

    Ironically, neglecting your oral health makes you more likely to develop problems. For instance, gingivitis is easily treated and reversed if diagnosed early. However, if you never get your teeth cleaned, gingivitis can develop into periodontal disease, which can be painful and eventually causes tooth loss.

    But knowing this doesn’t necessarily alleviate dental anxiety. What you need is a solution that makes you more at ease in the dentist’s chair. That’s where sedation dentistry comes in. Here’s what you need to know about making every dentist visit more comfortable.

    What is Sedation Dentistry?

    Sedation dentistry uses medication to help you relax while undergoing various dental procedures, from routine cleanings to root canals. Multiple levels of sedation are available to meet your needs:

    • Mild sedation: You remain awake, but you feel sleepy and relaxed.
    • Moderate sedation: You’re still able to communicate, but you may not remember much afterward.
    • Deep sedation: The medication takes you to the edge of consciousness, but your dentist can wake you as needed.
    • General anesthesia: You are completely unconscious during the procedure and unable to communicate.

    What Sedation Methods are Used?

    You may receive a sedative using one of these methods:

    • Inhalation: Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, is a mild to moderate sedative. Recovery is quick, so you can resume normal activities immediately.
    • Oral: Taking a pill is another needle-free way to achieve mild to moderate sedation.
    • Intramuscular (IM): Injecting medication into the muscle of your thigh or upper arm relaxes you quickly prior to your dental procedure.
    • Intravenous (IV): Lengthy or in-depth procedures may call for general anesthesia using an IV.

    Who is a Candidate for Sedation Dentistry?

    This could be a great option for you if:

    • You have dental anxiety.
    • You have a low pain threshold.
    • You have a strong gag reflex.
    • You are undergoing a long procedure or deep cleaning.
    • You need your wisdom teeth extracted.
    • You’re getting dental implants or a root canal.
    • Your child can’t sit still in the dentist’s chair.

    How Do I Find a Sedation Dentist I Can Trust?

    Park 56 Dental is IV-certified and licensed by the American Dental Association to perform sedation dentistry. This means we have received specialty training by the state Board of Dental Examiners to administer controlled medications that alter a patient’s consciousness to provide a comfortable, pain-free treatment.

    If this sounds like the experience you want to have at the dentist, please contact us today at (212) 826-2322 to find out which type of sedation dentistry may be right for you.

  • Everything You Need to Know about Mouthguards

    Playing sports can be risky. You could twist your ankle, sprain a wrist, bite your lip, or get a tooth knocked out. While you can’t eliminate all risks when playing sports, you can protect your teeth and lips by wearing a custom mouthguard. Learn more about your options here to help you decide what’s best for you.

    What is a Mouthguard?

    A mouthguard is an oral appliance designed to protect your teeth, lips, and cheeks from injury while playing sports. Similarly, night guards help prevent damage from nighttime tooth-grinding, also known as bruxism. The American Dental Association (ADA) has specific guidelines for what makes the ideal mouthguard. The appliance should:

    • Sit comfortably and securely in the wearer’s mouth
    • Cover all the teeth on one or both arches
    • Have a resilient design and construction with materials approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
    • Be easy to clean
    • Maintain high-impact energy absorption and force transmittance if the wearer is playing sports

    Types of Mouthguards

    Not all mouthguards are created equal. There are three main types to choose from:

    • Stock mouthguards come in various sizes, with most options fitting over the top teeth. This option can be bulky and uncomfortable.
    • Boil-and-bite mouthguards are inexpensive options available in most drugstores. You place the mouthguard in boiling water to soften it, and then mold it to your teeth for a better fit than most stock mouthguards can provide.
    • Custom-made mouthguards are the best, longest-lasting options available. A dentist makes a mouthpiece just for you, with the perfect fit and maximum comfort.

    Do I Need a Mouthguard?

    Mouthguards serve different purposes. You should consider getting one if any of the following applies to you:

    • You play sports. The ADA recommends mouthguards to protect against chipped teeth, knocked-out teeth, and soft tissue injuries while playing full-contact sports such as hockey, football, lacrosse, and wrestling. Athletes who play non-contact sports can also benefit from wearing a mouthguard.
    • You grind your teeth at night. You’ll need to wear a different kind of mouthguard, known as a night guard, to prevent tooth grinding while you sleep.
    • You have jaw joint disorder. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJD) is a condition that causes the muscles around your jaw to become inflamed, leading to tooth clenching and grinding. A specially made mouthguard can help with this.

    At Park 56 Dental, we help our patients protect their teeth with Under Armour® Performance Mouthwear™. These advanced mouthguards are custom-made to fit your bite for superior protection and comfort. Under Armour mouthpieces are made from the highest quality materials for safety and durability. Athletes who play sports in college, professional leagues, and the Olympics put their trust in Under Armour, and so can you.

    If you’re an athlete looking for the best teeth and mouth protection available, please call Park 56 Dental at (212) 826-2322 or schedule an appointment online today. We offer quick, custom mouthguard fittings that take as little as 20 minutes.

  • Invisalign During COVID Times

    Are you working toward a straighter, more beautiful smile with Invisalign? Perhaps you’re interested in pursuing this wire-free tooth-straightening method, but you’re not sure where to start. After all, the COVID-19 pandemic has altered dental practices and left many patients wondering what procedures are even available at this time.

    Rest assured that Park 56 Dental in NYC is open for business! We’ve made a few changes to ensure your safety and comfort while visiting our office. For instance, we provide a pre-visit health screening and contactless temperature check for all visitors and team members. We also offer masks and hand sanitizer upon request, and we maintain social distancing with staggered check-ins and zero wait times.

    Whether you’re interested in starting Invisalign or continuing your existing treatment during COVID times, we can meet your needs. Here’s what you need to know.

    Beginning Invisalign Treatment

    With the safety protocols in place at our New York City dentist office, now is a good time to begin Invisalign treatment. Visit our office for digital X-rays and a scan of your mouth. Thanks to advanced computer technology and your dentist’s expertise, you’ll receive a roadmap of your path to a straighter smile before leaving the office.

    Once the plan is finalized, custom aligners are made to fit your existing smile, along with 18 to 30 additional sets of aligners designed to gradually shift your teeth to the desired position over the next nine to 15 months or so. Pick up your aligners from us, and start wearing them to begin seeing a difference within a matter of weeks.

    Continuing Your Invisalign Treatment

    If you already have Invisalign aligners from before the pandemic, continue to wear them as usual. You should experience no delays in your treatment if you follow these tips:

    • Wear your aligners for at least 20 to 22 hours per day.
    • If you lose an aligner, move on to the next one.
    • If you have any issues with loose or poorly fitting aligners, give us a call.

    With today’s heightened focus on hygiene and avoiding illness, you should be extra diligent about keeping your Invisalign aligners clean during COVID times. Here’s how:

    • Wash your hands before putting in or taking out your Invisalign.
    • Rinse your aligners whenever you remove them, and clean them thoroughly morning and night.
    • Never eat or drink anything except water when wearing your aligners.
    • Store your aligners in a protective case anytime you take them out.
    • Brush or floss before putting your Invisalign back in.

    The skilled dentists at Park 56 Dental are ready to help transform your smile with Invisalign. If you’re still working from home during these COVID times, you’re sure to make an impression when you return to work a few months from now with straight, gorgeous teeth!

    Want to learn more about the Invisalign process? Ready to schedule a consultation at our New York City dentist office? Call us at (212) 826-2322 or contact us online today.

  • Should You Visit the Dentist During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

    For several weeks in early 2020, dentists in New York City and elsewhere across the globe were required to stop providing non-urgent care in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic. As we resume our “new normal,” many patients are asking—is it still too early to visit the dentist?

    Rest assured that the American Dental Association (ADA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are now allowing patients to return to the dentist for routine cleanings, cosmetic dentistry, and other elective services—with a few changes in place. Here’s what you should know before visiting the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Is My Dentist’s Office Safe?

    Germs are everywhere, but healthcare facilities, including dentist’s offices, have always been among the cleanest places you could go. Many safety guidelines have been the norm for years, including regularly washing your hands, sterilizing tools, and discarding certain gear and needles after a single use.

    In light of the pandemic, many dentists, including Park 56 Dental in NYC, are doing even more. Here are some of the steps we’re taking to ensure patient safety and comfort:

    • Conducting pre-visit health screenings and contactless temperature checks for all visitors and staff
    • Making masks and hand sanitizer available upon request
    • Staggering check-ins to minimize wait times and help maintain social distancing
    • Holding virtual appointments to answer questions or conduct follow-ups

    How “Essential” are Dentist Visits?

    The fact that dentist offices were shut down for everything but emergency procedures could make some people think that routine teeth cleanings aren’t that important. However, the condition of your teeth and gums can greatly impact your overall health. In fact, putting off routine cleanings could compound dental problems and other health issues in the months and years to come.

    The practical precautions that dentist offices are currently taking are effective at reducing the risk of coronavirus transmission while allowing you to care for your teeth and gums. Skipping your appointments any longer than necessary is simply not worth the risk to your oral health.

    What to Consider Before Going to the Dentist

    Social distancing is the best way to slow the spread of the coronavirus. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should self-isolate for 14 days. In short, cancel your dentist appointment if you’re not feeling well. You’ll be sent home if you come in with a cough, fever, or shortness of breath. You should also stay home if you think you have been around anyone who has the coronavirus, whether or not they have tested positive.

    Park 56 Dental in NYC is open for business! Anything that can be done remotely, such as payments or health questionnaires, will be handled over the phone or via email. We are taking COVID-19 restrictions seriously and place your safety above all else. Please call us at (212) 826-2322 or contact us online to ask questions about our coronavirus precautions or to schedule an appointment. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

  • What is an All-on-4 Implant Procedure?

    Just a decade ago, most patients were unaware that an All-on-4 implant procedure even existed. Today, many people specifically request this alternative to dentures and traditional full-arch implants. What exactly is this restoration technique, and could it be right for you?

    About All-on-4 Implants

    All-on-4 implants are a full-arch fixed dental implant bridge. This technology immediately replaces an entire row of teeth. As the name suggests, all the teeth are supported on just four posts that are surgically implanted into your jawbone. The result is a mouthful of healthy-looking, naturally functioning teeth.

    Benefits of All-on-4 Implants

    If you’re considering dental implants for a full arch of teeth, All-on-4 implants might be the better choice. The procedure is faster, more cost-effective, and requires no bone grafting for most patients. Plus, only four posts are needed compared to six or eight posts. In this way, All-on-4 implants save you time, money, and discomfort compared to traditional full-arch implants.

    Then, unlike dentures, All-on-4 implants:

    • Are permanent additions to your mouth that can be brushed like natural teeth
    • Never have to be taken out
    • Require no adhesives
    • Support a strong bite force so you can eat all your favorite foods again
    • Are comfortable because they are in a fixed position rather than pressing on your gums when you bite and chew
    • Allow for the full taste and temperature experience of your food
    • Prevent jawbone deterioration
    • Help you maintain a healthy facial structure

    The All-on-4 Implants Procedure

    This technology uses “tilted implants” to increase strength and stability, as well as avoid damage to the sinus cavity in the upper jaw and the nerve canal in the lower jaw. The initial surgery involves installing the implants. A temporary set of teeth is placed over the implants before you leave the office. Once the healing process is complete about six months after surgery, a permanent, custom bridge is placed.

    Candidates for All-on-4 Implants

    You may be a good candidate for this procedure if you are missing most or all of your teeth on one or both arches. It doesn’t matter whether you already wear dentures or not. Age is also not a limiting factor—as long as you’re in good overall health, you may qualify.

    Be prepared to take excellent care of your All-on-4 implants, using many of the same techniques you would expect with natural teeth. Proper care is needed to help your implants last for many years to come. Rest assured that your dental hygienist will review all instructions with you and recommend the best daily oral care plan to fit your needs.

    The skilled dentists at Park 56 Dental work with the nation’s top laboratories for access to 3D, digitally guided plans. This ensures expert post placement and flawless prosthetic teeth for a smile you can be proud of! If you’re interested in learning more about the All-on-4 implant procedure, please contact us online or call our New York City dentist office at (212) 826-2322.

  • How to Prevent Gum Disease

    The technical name for gum disease is periodontitis or periodontal disease. This is a common infection that, according to a recent CDC report, affects nearly half of all American adults age 30 and older.

    The mildest form of this disease is called gingivitis. Early symptoms include tender and swollen gums, gums that bleed when you brush your teeth, and a receding gum line. If left untreated, periodontal disease can become painful, lead to pussy discharge, and even result in tooth loss. Advanced gum disease can also increase the risk of stroke, heart attack, and other health problems.

    Protect yourself from gum disease and the associated side effects by following these preventative tips.

    • Brush with fluoride toothpaste. Make this a habit every morning and evening, no matter how busy or tired you are. Use toothpaste that contains fluoride and has the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Choose a soft toothbrush, and brush thoroughly but gently to avoid irritating your gums. Brush for two full minutes, and hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle along the gum line so it sweeps away the bacteria hiding there.
    • Floss every day. When it comes to preventing gum disease, flossing is arguably more important than brushing because it stimulates the gums and removes debris from between your teeth. The American Dental Association says it doesn’t matter when you floss—do it in the morning, at night, or after lunch—just do it!
    • Swish with a medicated mouthwash. All mouthwash products offer some benefits, but some promote gum health better than others. Shop for a version that reduces plaque buildup, slows tartar formation, fights gingivitis, or all three! Remember, mouthwash complements brushing and flossing—it doesn’t replace it.
    • Consider and address your risks. Some people are more likely than others to get gum disease. Risk factors include advancing age, genetics, AIDS, cancer, and hormonal changes in females. While many risk factors are out of your control, others can be addressed. For instance, you can reduce your risk if you quit smoking and control associated health conditions, such as diabetes.
    • Get your teeth cleaned regularly. Gum disease develops rather quickly, and the earlier you begin treatment, the better. Therefore, children and adults of all ages should schedule a dental exam and professional cleaning every six months or as recommended by their dentist. If you already have gum disease, you may need more frequent visits to maintain your gums and prevent them from getting any worse.

    At Park 56 Dental, our team of qualified dental professionals can help your smile stay healthy and beautiful. We encourage you to visit us twice a year for preventative care. Then, if you notice signs of gum disease or other oral health problems, reach out to us right away. We’ll help you slow or even reverse gum disease with effective treatments such as root planing and scaling, flap surgery, and bone and tissue grafts. Contact us online or call us at (212) 826-2322 to learn more.

  • What is a Dead Tooth?

    You may not think of your teeth as being alive, but they are. The outer shell, called the enamel, is the hardest substance in the human body. However, the nerves and blood vessels at the heart of your teeth are soft and vulnerable. If this inner layer (known as the pulp) becomes damaged, blood may stop flowing. A tooth with no blood flow is called a “dead” tooth. Without treatment, this tooth may become infected or abscessed and will eventually fall out.

    What Causes a Dead Tooth?

    Trauma or injury is a common reason for a tooth to die. Falling or being hit in the mouth can cut off the blood supply to a tooth or even cause blood vessels to burst. With no blood flow, the nerve inside the pulp dies.

    Tooth decay is another possible cause. Without consistent dental hygiene habits, cavities can start to form. Left untreated, decay slowly eats through the tooth toward the sensitive pulp, eventually causing an infection. Inflammation may cut off blood flow to the pulp, causing the tooth to die.

    How to Spot a Dead Tooth

    It isn’t always easy to identify a dead tooth. Only a dental professional can pinpoint signs of restricted blood flow and a dying tooth in its early stages, which is why regular dentist visits are so important. Before long, though, the problem will soon become apparent.

    Pain is the first symptom to watch out for. This may seem odd because the nerve inside your tooth is dead, but that’s not where the pain comes from. Bacteria and dead nerve remnants touching the extremely sensitive nerve endings around your tooth, called the periodontal membrane, are the source of your pain.

    A change in color comes next. Dead teeth often darken over time as red blood cells die. This is very similar to developing a bruise. If a single tooth in your mouth gradually becomes yellow, gray, or black, visit the dentist right away.

    Signs of infection could also appear if the dead tooth doesn’t receive treatment. You may notice swelling, a bad taste in your mouth, or an inflamed sore on your gums.

    Treatment for a Dead Tooth

    A root canal is the first option. Dentists want to avoid removing teeth whenever possible, and this procedure could save a dead or dying tooth. It involves removing all signs of decay and infection from deep within the tooth. Then, the dentist fills and seals it. In many cases, a crown is needed following a root canal.

    Tooth extraction is the next choice. Even if your dentist can’t save your tooth, prompt treatment is necessary to avoid other complications. Once removed, you have several options for replacing the missing tooth, including an implant, bridge, or partial denture.

    Park 56 Dental offers tooth care and smile restorations out of our spa-like, patient-centered New York dentist office. If you notice signs of a dead tooth, please contact us online or call us at (212) 826-2322 to schedule an appointment.

  • What is a Dental Bridge?

    There are several options for replacing missing teeth, including dental bridges. Closing the gap in your smile can help prevent problems with your existing teeth and gums, including driting, bone loss, difficulty chewing, or speech problems. Learn more about dental bridges to help you decide if this is the right restorative treatment for you.

    What is a Dental Bridge?

    Dental bridges literally “bridge the gap” left by one or more missing teeth. A bridge is comprised of multiple parts:

    • Crowns cap the teeth on either side of the gap, known as the abutment teeth.
    • One or more false teeth, called pontics, are suspended between the crowns to replace the missing tooth or teeth.
    • Crowns and pontics may be made of porcelain, alloys, gold, or other materials.

    What is the Process of Receiving a Dental Bridge?

    Your first visit with the dentist involves preparing the abutment teeth by removing some of the enamel. This creates room to place crowns, which serve as anchors for the pontic cemented between them.

    During the same visit, your dentist takes an impression of your teeth to use as a model when creating custom pontics and crowns for your dental bridge. A temporary bridge protects your exposed teeth and gums until the permanent product is finished.

    At your second appointment, the dentist removes the temporary bridge and puts the new pontic and crowns in place. Temporary cement ensures a comfortable fit. After a few weeks, you return to the dentist one final time to have the bridge firmly cemented in place.

    Factors to Consider

    When comparing bridges with other tooth-replacement options, keep these factors in mind:

    • Time: You can complete the dental bridge process in two or three visits spaced within a few weeks of each other.
    • Cost: While your insurance coverage determines what you pay out of pocket, bridges tend to be a middle-of-the-road option, with dentures costing less and implants costing more.
    • Longevity: With excellent oral hygiene and regular checkups, dental bridges can last up to 15 years.
    • Aesthetics: Pontics aren’t embedded in the gum line, so it may be possible to distinguish them from your natural teeth upon close inspection. For this reason, bridges often replace teeth toward the back of the mouth.
    • Comfort: Bridges are not removable, so there’s no risk of slipping, which may exist with some types of dentures.
    • Oral care: Whether you have a dental bridge or not, you should brush twice a day and floss once a day. If you have a bridge, your dentist may also recommend using antiseptic mouthwash and a special flossing tool to clean out debris from under the pontic.

    Park 56 Dental is pleased to offer bridges and other smile restoration options to meet your diverse needs. We operate out of our spa-like, patient-centered New York office that makes going to the dentist a pleasure. Contact us online or call us at (212) 826-2322 to schedule a consultation for dental bridges in NYC today.